I Love Ransomware

I had a few minutes to timesink yesterday and was reading stories on Google News. One link leads to another, and before I knew it, I was sucked into a story on 40 little known facts about TV’s most popular situation comedy ever, “I Love Lucy”. What could be more wholesome web viewing?

I rather quickly noticed that the text accompanying the pictures was very poorly written. Words were misspelled and misused with alarming frequency. I was convinced that the writing had been outsourced to an offshore bot that had stolen the content elsewhere on the interwebs.

And then, this happened.


My computer was crazily beeping and there was a fake virus alert displayed on the screen. Of course I took the time to close the browser (despite the false warning that I would not be able to) and make sure that my workstation was not actually infected. Such fun!

A brief Google survey revealed that the call center number displayed, (877) 337-7936, is often connected with malware scam artists. Most of the displayed pages seem to be further attempts to get you to install real malware on your system. Don’t fall for them.

Then I made the call. I was the end user from hell that these cyberpirates deserve. Imagine if Ransomware Inc. got hundreds of calls like this every day? They’d have no time to hold up their other poor victims and their profit margins would take a dive. The obvious annoyance of the Ransomware Agent at about 7 minutes into the call, when he lets out an exasperated “Yeeeeessss”, is priceless.

Remember, October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Stay safe online.

Windows 10 Anniversary Update DHCPV6 (Still) Broken

According to threads on Microsoft’s Developer Network, DHCPV6 has been broken since the first deployments of the Anniversary Update last August. I first noticed an issue on October 4 where several Windows clients would no longer register their IPV6 DNS address post update.

While this has been broken for a couple of months, I was advised today by Adam Rudell, a Microsoft Support Escalation Engineer, that the “PG is actively investigating. I just updated the TechNet thread and will follow up as soon as PG has provided me some more information.”

The full thread can be read here.

Bad Mobile Device Manners In-Flight

Yesterday, a cacophony of irritating noises permeated my brain on board an otherwise pleasant United flight from Orlando to Newark.

Some airlines think they have improved service by providing free entertainment streaming on personal mobile devices. And of course, in-flight wifi is becoming ever more commonplace. Actually, what the airlines have done is saved a bundle of money on maintaining those personal seat back screens. They’ve also created a major new source of in-flight irritation.

The problem is not the airlines per se, but the inconsiderate and ill-mannered behavior of un-civil society members on board.

Let me make things clear. If your child is playing a game on their mobile device, turn off the sound. I don’t want to hear the bloops and beeps.

If you are watching a video, turn off the sound or use headphones. I am not interested in your video, no matter what it is.

If you are texting inflight I don’t want to hear a chime, buzz, or bell each time you receive a message. Turn them off.

If you are listening to music, use headphones and keep the volume at a level so that I don’t have to listen to your music. I don’t want to hear it no matter how good you think it is.

Cabin crews — please add a blurb to your in-flight announcements regarding courteous use of personal entertainment devices. Require use of headphones with any sound generating device. If you hear or see someone violating this request (which ought to be a rule) instruct the violator about expected behavior. Don’t ignore it to the point where I need to call you over to deal with it.